Drive Alert

DROWSY DRIVING IS JUST AS DANGEROUS AS DRUNK DRIVING

REMEMBERING MADELINE

“I learned the hard way about the dangers of drowsy driving-when I fell asleep behind the wheel and crashed and my little sister, Madie, died.”

– Taylor Morris

YOU’RE MORE LIKELY TO FALL ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL IF YOU ARE:

  • Sleep-deprived or fatigued (six hours of sleep or less triples your risk)
  • Driving longer than 100 miles or two hours without proper rest breaks
  • Driving alone — having a companion can help you stay alert
  • Driving on a long, rural or dark road
  • Driving through the night, mid-afternoon or when you would normally be asleep
  • Taking sedating medications (e.g., antidepressants, cold tablets, antihistamines)
  • Working more than 60 hours a week (increases your risk by 40 percent)
  • Suffering from insomnia or poor quality sleep
  • Drinking even small amounts of alcohol

DROWSY DRIVING WARNING SIGNS INCLUDE:

  • Difficulty focusing, frequent blinking or heavy eyelids
  • Daydreaming or wandering thoughts
  • Trouble remembering the last few miles driven
  • Yawning repeatedly or rubbing your eyes
  • Trouble keeping your head up
  • Drifting from your lane, tailgating or hitting a shoulder rumble strip
  • Feeling restless and irritable

Don't be a Bob

Never risk drowsy driving. Pull over, switch drivers, find a safe place to sleep. Drowsy driving is not worth your life, or the lives of others.

WHEN FEELING DROWSY, DRIVERS SHOULD FIRST PULL OVER, THEN:

  • Switch drivers
  • Take a 10- to 20-minute nap
  • Get out of the car and stretch or jog for a few minutes
  • Eat a snack
  • Find a safe place to sleep for the night
Zero Fatalities - Drive Sober Icon

Staying awake for 18 hours is equal to being intoxicated

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Those who average 6 hours of sleep or less, are 3X more likely to crash

Drivers under age 25 are involved in 42 percent of all drowsy driving crashes